Animators

Shake animation of an ImageView

Under res folder, create a new folder called "anim" to store your animation resources and put this on that folder.

shakeanimation.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<rotate xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:duration="100"
    android:fromDegrees="-15"
    android:pivotX="50%"
    android:pivotY="50%"
    android:repeatCount="infinite"
    android:repeatMode="reverse"
    android:toDegrees="15" />

Create a blank activity called Landing

activity_landing.xml

  <RelativeLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent">

        <ImageView
            android:id="@+id/imgBell"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_centerInParent="true"
            android:src="@mipmap/ic_notifications_white_48dp"/>

    </RelativeLayout>

And the method for animate the imageview on Landing.java

Context mContext;


 @Override
        protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
            mContext=this;
                setContentView(R.layout.activity_landing);

                AnimateBell();
        }

public void AnimateBell() {
        Animation shake = AnimationUtils.loadAnimation(mContext, R.anim.shakeanimation);
        ImageView imgBell= (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.imgBell);
        imgBell.setImageResource(R.mipmap.ic_notifications_active_white_48dp);
        imgBell.setAnimation(shake);
    }

Fade in/out animation

In order to get a view to slowly fade in or out of view, use an ObjectAnimator. As seen in the code below, set a duration using .setDuration(millis) where the millis parameter is the duration (in milliseconds) of the animation. In the below code, the views will fade in / out over 500 milliseconds, or 1/2 second. To start the ObjectAnimator's animation, call .start(). Once the animation is complete, onAnimationEnd(Animator animation) is called. Here is a good place to set your view's visibility to View.GONE or View.VISIBLE.

import android.animation.Animator;
import android.animation.AnimatorListenerAdapter;
import android.animation.ValueAnimator;

void fadeOutAnimation(View viewToFadeOut) {
    ObjectAnimator fadeOut = ObjectAnimator.ofFloat(viewToFadeOut, "alpha", 1f, 0f);

    fadeOut.setDuration(500);
    fadeOut.addListener(new AnimatorListenerAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void onAnimationEnd(Animator animation) {
            // We wanna set the view to GONE, after it's fade out. so it actually disappear from the layout & don't take up space.
            viewToFadeOut.setVisibility(View.GONE);
        }
    });

    fadeOut.start();
}

void fadeInAnimation(View viewToFadeIn) {
    ObjectAnimator fadeIn = ObjectAnimator.ofFloat(viewToFadeIn, "alpha", 0f, 1f);
    fadeIn.setDuration(500);

    fadeIn.addListener(new AnimatorListenerAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void onAnimationStar(Animator animation) {
            // We wanna set the view to VISIBLE, but with alpha 0. So it appear invisible in the layout.
            viewToFadeIn.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
            viewToFadeIn.setAlpha(0);
        }
    });

    fadeIn.start();
}

TransitionDrawable animation

This example displays a transaction for an image view with only two images.(can use more images as well one after the other for the first and second layer positions after each transaction as a loop)

  • add a image array to res/values/arrays.xml
<resources>

    <array
        name="splash_images">
        <item>@drawable/spash_imge_first</item>
        <item>@drawable/spash_img_second</item>
    </array>

</resources>

    private Drawable[] backgroundsDrawableArrayForTransition;
    private TransitionDrawable transitionDrawable;

private void backgroundAnimTransAction() {

        // set res image array
        Resources resources = getResources();
        TypedArray icons = resources.obtainTypedArray(R.array.splash_images);

        @SuppressWarnings("ResourceType")
        Drawable drawable = icons.getDrawable(0);    // ending image

        @SuppressWarnings("ResourceType")
        Drawable drawableTwo = icons.getDrawable(1);   // starting image


        backgroundsDrawableArrayForTransition = new Drawable[2];
        backgroundsDrawableArrayForTransition[0] = drawable;
        backgroundsDrawableArrayForTransition[1] = drawableTwo;
        transitionDrawable = new TransitionDrawable(backgroundsDrawableArrayForTransition);

        // your image view here - backgroundImageView
        backgroundImageView.setImageDrawable(transitionDrawable);
        transitionDrawable.startTransition(4000);

        transitionDrawable.setCrossFadeEnabled(false); // call public methods  

      
    }

ValueAnimator

ValueAnimator introduces a simple way to animate a value (of a particular type, e.g. int, float, etc.).

The usual way of using it is:

  1. Create a ValueAnimator that will animate a value from min to max
  2. Add an UpdateListener in which you will use the calculated animated value (which you can obtain with getAnimatedValue())

There are two ways you can create the ValueAnimator:

(the example code animates a float from 20f to 40f in 250ms)

  1. From xml (put it in the /res/animator/):
<animator xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:duration="250"
    android:valueFrom="20"
    android:valueTo="40"
    android:valueType="floatType"/>
ValueAnimator animator = (ValueAnimator) AnimatorInflater.loadAnimator(context, 
        R.animator.example_animator);
animator.addUpdateListener(new ValueAnimator.AnimatorUpdateListener() {
    @Override
    public void onAnimationUpdate(ValueAnimator anim) {
        // ... use the anim.getAnimatedValue()
    }
});
// set all the other animation-related stuff you want (interpolator etc.)
animator.start();
  1. From the code:
ValueAnimator animator = ValueAnimator.ofFloat(20f, 40f);
animator.setDuration(250);
animator.addUpdateListener(new ValueAnimator.AnimatorUpdateListener() {
    @Override
    public void onAnimationUpdate(ValueAnimator anim) {
        // use the anim.getAnimatedValue()
    }
});
// set all the other animation-related stuff you want (interpolator etc.)
animator.start();

ObjectAnimator

ObjectAnimator is a subclass of ValueAnimator with the added ability to set the calculated value to the property of a target View.


Just like in the ValueAnimator, there are two ways you can create the ObjectAnimator:

(the example code animates an alpha of a View from 0.4f to 0.2f in 250ms)

  1. From xml (put it in the /res/animator)
<objectAnimator xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
                android:duration="250"
                android:propertyName="alpha"
                android:valueFrom="0.4"
                android:valueTo="0.2"
                android:valueType="floatType"/>
ObjectAnimator animator = (ObjectAnimator) AnimatorInflater.loadAnimator(context,
        R.animator.example_animator);
animator.setTarget(exampleView);
// set all the animation-related stuff you want (interpolator etc.)
animator.start();
  1. From code:
ObjectAnimator animator = ObjectAnimator.ofFloat(exampleView, View.ALPHA, 0.4f, 0.2f);
animator.setDuration(250);
// set all the animation-related stuff you want (interpolator etc.)
animator.start();

ViewPropertyAnimator

ViewPropertyAnimator is a simplified and optimized way to animate properties of a View.

Every single View has a ViewPropertyAnimator object available through the animate() method. You can use that to animate multiple properties at once with a simple call. Every single method of a ViewPropertyAnimator specifies the target value of a specific parameter that the ViewPropertyAnimator should animate to.

View exampleView = ...;
exampleView.animate()
        .alpha(0.6f)
        .translationY(200)
        .translationXBy(10)
        .scaleX(1.5f)
        .setDuration(250)
        .setInterpolator(new FastOutLinearInInterpolator());

Note: Calling start() on a ViewPropertyAnimator object is NOT mandatory. If you don't do that you're just letting the platform to handle the starting of the animation in the appropriate time (next animation handling pass). If you actually do that (call start()) you're making sure the animation is started immediately.

Expand and Collapse animation of View

public class ViewAnimationUtils {
        
        public static void expand(final View v) {
            v.measure(LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT);
            final int targtetHeight = v.getMeasuredHeight();
    
            v.getLayoutParams().height = 0;
            v.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
            Animation a = new Animation()
            {
                @Override
                protected void applyTransformation(float interpolatedTime, Transformation t) {
                    v.getLayoutParams().height = interpolatedTime == 1
                            ? LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT
                            : (int)(targtetHeight * interpolatedTime);
                    v.requestLayout();
                }
    
                @Override
                public boolean willChangeBounds() {
                    return true;
                }
            };
    
            a.setDuration((int)(targtetHeight / v.getContext().getResources().getDisplayMetrics().density));
            v.startAnimation(a);
        }
    
        public static void collapse(final View v) {
            final int initialHeight = v.getMeasuredHeight();
    
            Animation a = new Animation()
            {
                @Override
                protected void applyTransformation(float interpolatedTime, Transformation t) {
                    if(interpolatedTime == 1){
                        v.setVisibility(View.GONE);
                    }else{
                        v.getLayoutParams().height = initialHeight - (int)(initialHeight * interpolatedTime);
                        v.requestLayout();
                    }
                }
    
                @Override
                public boolean willChangeBounds() {
                    return true;
                }
            };
    
            a.setDuration((int)(initialHeight / v.getContext().getResources().getDisplayMetrics().density));
            v.startAnimation(a);
        }
    }